REWIND REVIEWS

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Our most recent full and technical reviews are previewed here but you can browse all 4649 of our reviews by using our A-Z of reviews below.

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FULL REVIEWS
Pulse AKA Kairo AKA The Circuit (Blu-ray) by Paul Lewis (26th July 2017)

Kairo / Pulse / Circuit (Kurosawa Kiyoshi, 2001) Kurosawa Kiyoshi’s Kairo (known in English as Pulse, the title under which it has been released on this new Blu-ray from Arrow Video, and also as Circuit) was one of the most interesting films within the boom in ‘J-horror’ films that took place in the late 1990s and early 2000s, following the international successes of films such as Nakata Hideo’s The Ring (1998), Miike Takashi’s Audition (1998) and Shimizu Takashi’s Ju-On: The Grudge (2002). Like those films, Pulse was subjected to an American remake (in 2006, directed by Jim Sonzero). Pulse also saw an unofficial remake in Turkey (D@bbe, directed by Hasan Karacag), released the same year as the US remake. Pulse tells the parallel narratives of two young people, Michi and Kawashima. These two narrativ...


Your Name. by James-Masaki Ryan (26th July 2017)

“Your Name.” 「君の名は。」 (2016) Mitsuha (played by Mone Kamishiaishi) is a high school girl living in Itamori, a mountainside town by a lake in rural Japan. Living with her younger sister Yotsuha (played by Kanon Tani) and their grandmother (played by Etsuko Ishihara), they are priestesses at the local shrine preparing for the annual festival happening in twenty days time. While trying to balance school life and practicing rituals for the ceremonies, she is also having a difficult relationship with her father (played by Masaki Terasoma) - the incumbent mayor of the town. Strict to his townsfolk, he also has an estranged relationship with his daughters and mother-in-law as he separated from the life of priesthood after Mitsuha’s mother died. Taki (played by Ryunosuke Kamiki) is a high school boy living in the city of Tokyo. Living with his father in a standard apartment, he is a...


Future Shock! The Story of 2000 AD (Blu-ray) by Paul Lewis (26th July 2017)

Future Shock! The Story of ‘2000AD’ (2014) Like many boys growing up in the 1980s, at a certain age I transitioned from the world of The Beano and Dandy to Eagle, Victor and, of course, 2000AD. Moving on to reading 2000AD was the 1980s equivalent of transitioning from shorts to long trousers. (Though Pat Mills makes some disparaging remarks about Eagle in this documentary, in all honesty I remember being equally fond of the 1980s run of that comic as I was of 2000AD.) In fact, one of the highlights of my youth was having a letter published in 2000AD (about, as I recall, the ‘Tharg’s Future Shocks’ column, which I loved). Though this was many years ago, I believe my efforts were rewarded with the ‘letter of the week’ because I received from the publication a toy, a Manta Force vehicle named ‘The Scythe’, and I was so proud of this achievement that this specific toy would be returned to its box each time I finished playing with it, along with the letter I...


Peppermint Soda by James-Masaki Ryan (25th July 2017)

“Peppermint Soda” (“Diabolo Menthe”) (1977) Summer vacation of 1963 is over and so it’s time for sisters Anne (played by Eléonore Klarwein) and Frédérique (played by Odile Michel) to go back to Paris to their mother’s (played by Anouk Ferjac) place after the seasonal stay with their father (played by Michel Puterflam). It also means it’s time to go back to their strict all girls’ school for the new year. With Anne being 13 she is still a little kid at heart who is more interested in pranks and silly happenings, but she is also experiencing the first signs of puberty just as her classmates are. At 15 Frédérique is getting more interested in boys as well as signs of independence while also showing Anne who is boss. There are all sorts of happenings within the school year for both of them and to their classmates. The girls try to say silly answers to teachers’ questions to get a laugh. Awkward happenings in gym class. Classmates bragging about experiencing their first kiss. ...


Terror in a Texas Town (Blu-ray) by Paul Lewis (23rd July 2017)

Terror in a Texas Town (Joseph H Lewis, 1958) Joseph H LewisTerror in a Texas Town (1958), the final feature film of its director (who ended his career as a director of episodes of television Westerns), sits squarely within the realm of the 1950s ‘adult Western’ – Westerns that dealt with darker themes, feature conflicted protagonists and antagonists, and often amplified their violent content. As such, like other ‘adult Westerns’ of the 1950s such as Delmer Daves’ 3:10 to Yuma (1957) and Andre de Toth’s Day of the Outlaw (1959), Terror in a Texas Town sometimes resembles contemporaneous films noir. In the case of Terror in a Texas Town, the narrative and thematic similarities with the paradigms of films noir are amplified via the monochrome photography – which, like that of many films noir of the period, makes use of cluttered compositions and obtuse angl...


The Fabulous Baron Munchausen by Eric Cotenas (23rd July 2017)

"Luna till now belonged but to the poets, to the dreamers, to daring fantasists and adventurers in powdered wigs, to fantasists in frock coats, and to those in bizarre helmets from the pages of the newest novels, and of course to the lovers, to them Luna was always most dear," says French novelist Cyrano de Bergerac – or, rather Edmond Rostand's characterization of him – in the literally explosive climax of the hybrid animation/live-action fantasy The Fabulous Baron Munchausen from the great Karel Zeman (The Stolen Airship), based as much on the Gottfried August Bürger translation of tall tales attributed to the real life Karl Friedrich Hieronymus Freiherr von Münchhausen as on the definitive illustrations of Gustave Doré. When man lands on the moon, the above is exactly what astronaut Tonik (I Served the King of England's Rudolf Jelínek) discovers when he is welcomed by Gun Club president Barbicane (


Buster's Mal Heart by Eric Cotenas (23rd July 2017)

Not destined to become a cult classic in spite of its stab at the sub-genre of Canadian indie weirdness capitalizing on the wide-eyed anxiety of Rami Malek (Mr. Robot) and DJ Qualls (Road Trip) pretty much playing a variation on himself. Living under the roof of his in-laws (Insidious' Lin Shaye and The Patriot's R.J. Burns), Jonah (Malek) dreams of living self-sufficiently on a chunk of land owned outright while his former addict wife Marty (You're Next's Kate Lyn Sheil) is just thinking about just getting by from one day...


The Orchard End Murder by James-Masaki Ryan (23rd July 2017)

“The Orchard End Murder” (1981) Star cricket player Robins (played by Mark Hardy) is nowhere to be found at the game because he is busy with other thoughts - making out with his girlfriend Pauline (played by Tracy Hyde) in the orchard. With her sexy mini one piece dress and white stockings, she is obviously a city girl visiting from London to be with him in Kent. Pauline is not too interested in the sport and decides to take a walk around the small town on her own as he plays, in which she finds a small cottage with a cute gnome garden. There she meets the railway gatekeeper (played by Bill Wallis) who offers her tea, and also Ewen (played by Clive Mantle) who is a giant brute that seems to have a mind of a stubborn child rather than a grown man of his age. But what seems to be a simple walk through town ends with an unsuspecting murder… “The Orchard End Murder” was written and directed by Christian Marnham making h...


Willard by Anthony Arrigo (23rd July 2017)

Despite their association with plague, disease, garbage, and filthy environments rats actually make some of the best pets. They’re clean, sociable, can learn tricks, and are affectionate in their own way. The biggest downside to owning one is their lifespan, a mere 2-3 years. I have had three as pets during various times in my life and each one had a distinct personality, something Willard recognizes when he comes across a family of rats in his backyard in the eponymous film, “Willard” (1971). Although I had never seen the original, I am a fan of Glen Morgan’s 2003 remake that stars Crispin Glover as the bookish social outcast who counts only rats as his friends. That re-working of the source material is far superior to this dated 70's relic, and it also features the sequel’s title track “Ben” as sung by Crispin Glover in a DVD bonus feature that is enough to warrant a purchase all on its own. This 1971 version is a flat-lined mess, with no suspense and a weak lead in Bruce Davison who, ironically, comes across as the least sympathetic charac...


Ben by Anthony Arrigo (23rd July 2017)

“Where “Willard” ended… BEN begins. And this time, he’s not alone!” This is true. “Ben” (1972) picks up during the final moments of “Willard” (1971), with our leading man about to be consumed by Ben and his buddies after turning his back on former friends. Eventually, the cops show up and survey the gruesome scene. The big to-do draws the attention of some locals, including young loner Danny (Lee Montgomery). The hubbub dies down and everyone leaves, but not long after an investigating cop comes across Ben and his rat army and they eat him alive. Watch how easily he dies and then remind yourself this man was trained to protect the streets. Ben is a smart rat but he enjoys the company of a human host, apparently, so he befriends Danny one afternoon. The young child with no actual human friends whatsoever gleefully picks up street rat after street rat, allowing them access to his room and bed without a single thought giving to disease. Ah, the mind of a child. The rat army still acts on its own accord, striking at a grocery store one night and cleaning out the shelves. The cops do some investigating – yes, really –...


Beyond the Gates by Anthony Arrigo (23rd July 2017)

Riding atop a wave of that sweet genre festival buzz, I had high hopes for the retro styling of “Beyond the Gates” (2016). A Luddite love letter to the bygone relics of VHS and interactive board games (both of which, oddly enough, have made minor comebacks), the synopsis and trailer suggest viewers are in for 82 minutes of otherworldly dimensions, bloody splatter, daddy issues, and splashes of neon horror. I couldn’t help but ramp up my excitement after popping in the disc and being greeted by Wojciech Golczewski’s Italian pop-infused synth melodies, as the main menu portends a trio of lead actors venturing into some cryptic netherrealm operating under the auspices of Barbara Crampton’s big head. Unfortunately, what I got was something more akin to “Beyond the Budget”, where spotty acting and a dearth of activity consume much of the runtime. It is over an hour into the picture before anyone even attempts the eponymous journey, conveniently located in the primary location’s basement, and by that point my interest had long since tucked into bed for a snooze. Ambition was in the air but it never materialized where it counts: the screen. ...


Car Wash by Anthony Arrigo (23rd July 2017)

“Car Wash” (1976) is a tough film to review because it only sorta qualifies as a movie. Playing like the granddaddy to “Friday” (1995) that it is, “Car Wash” is a “day in the life” picture that showcases a variety of comedic and dramatic talents, each being given their own moment in the spotlight to show that behind these invisible workers are real people dealing with real problems. The film plays more like a series of character vignettes than a cohesive piece. Director Michael Schultz, working off a script by future director Joel Schumacher, has no problem spreading the on-camera wealth, highlighting each of the dozen-or-so characters and turning the lens on their hopes, dreams, nightmares, and harsh reality. While much of the action is relegated to comedy and goofing off, there are some strong messages in here that are clearly aimed at the black community, hoping to spread some positivity before sending viewers out of the theater. Thanks to a patently 70's aesthetic and a few big-time names, like Richard Pryor and George Carlin, “Car Wash” ...


Species: Collector's Edition by Anthony Arrigo (23rd July 2017)

The life cycle of a film is rarely as simple as “write script, sell it, make movie”. Oftentimes a script can vary wildly from initial iteration to filmed feature with so many changes implemented in the interim it doesn’t even resemble the original concept. “Species” (1995) started life as “The Message”, a police procedural that had similar core ideas to what eventually came to be, though it was roundly rejected by major studios. Writer Dennis Feldman rewrote his idea as a spec script and sent it off to producer Frank Mancuso, Jr. (who had a hand in five “Friday the 13th” sequels), who ordered further changes before it was deemed ready for prime time. With something filmable finally in hand, there were two inclusions to director Roger Donaldson’s film that pushed it past the point of being just another sci-fi alien thriller: newcomer Natasha Henstridge, and famed Swedish artist H.R. Giger. The former brought with her a fresh face and an unyielding amount of sex appeal, while the latter contribute...


Terminal Island by James-Masaki Ryan (22nd July 2017)

“Terminal Island” (1973) Terminal Island - a guarded island where hard sentenced criminals are taken, never to be able to return to the mainland. Carmen (played by Ena Hartman) is the newest arrival to the savage island, immediately seeing the dangers by witnessing random dead bodies of prisoners scattered on the beach still wearing their blue prison outfits. Milford (played by Tom Selleck) is her first human encounter - a former doctor who helps her for the night but warns her that others on the island may not be so kind. When she finds a village the next day looking for a means of survival, Monk (played by Roger E. Mosley) shows her who the leaders are through brute force. Women are enslaved for the men having to do much of the physical labor as well as sexual pleasure, commanded by the leader Bobby (played by Sean Kenney). While all seems hopeless for Carmen and the other women, a group of separatists are looking to find better life and rule on the ruthless island, l...


The Stone Killer by James-Masaki Ryan (22nd July 2017)

“The Stone Killer” (1973) Torrey (played by Charles Bronson) is a detective that does not play by the rules. Fast at pulling the trigger as well as beating his suspects to confess, the third killing of a suspect in a month’s span leads to him being transferred from New York to Los Angeles. While out in the west Torrey is on the tail of mafia don Al Vescari (played by Martin Balsam) who along with his gang is out to take over the underworld. Torrey puts the pieces together to try to take down the man along with all the other lowlifes along the way. Directed by Michael Winner in his second collaboration with actor Charles Bronson following “Chato's Land”, “The Stone Killer” was an action packed fast paced brutal film, but sadly one that lacks coherence and depth with an awkwardly convoluted plot that seemingly goes nowhere and everywhere at the same time. The highlight of the piece is undeniably the car/motorcycle chase with Bronson seemingly wan...


A United Kingdom by Robert Segedy (21st July 2017)

"This is likely the most inspiring story of love and endurance ever told" - Nelson Mandela. Falling in love is a tough business, falling in love with a black king makes things tougher, being a white woman in the 40’s in England, makes things practically impossible. Based on Susan Williams’ book, "Colour Bar", this film tells the story of Sertse Khama and Ruth Williams, and how their love conquered politics and prejudice. It is England in 1947 and Seretse Khama (David Oyelowo) is a law student; he is also an amateur boxer, and an apparent heir to the throne of the country of Bechuanaland (now known as Botswana). One night he happens to meet Ruth Williams (Rosamund Pike) at a dance, and the chemistry between them in undeniable. The problem is that Williams is a lowly daughter of a salesman and she happens to be white; that is socially unacceptable. Some people may think that love is color blind, but that is not the case as far as Ruth's father is concerned. When she announces that she has found the man that she wants to spend the...


The Lost City of Z by Eric Cotenas (20th July 2017)

Based on the bestselling partially-fictional book by David Grann, The Lost City of Z is the story of Major Percy Fawcett (Pacific Rim's Charlie Hunnum), a career military man who has spent his more recent years training soldiers at a barracks in County Corke as of 1905. "Unadorned" and unlikely to advance due to his "unfortunate choice in ancestors" (i.e. a father who drunk and gambled away two family fortunes), Fawcett is content with his independent-minded wife Nina (Foxcatcher's Sienna Miller) and young son Jack, but secretly yearns for action. Sent to London for an appointment with the Royal Geographic Society, Fawcett finds himself assigned to map the border between Bolivia and Brazil as a neutral third party in hopes of preventing a war for control of the area's lucrative rubber trade. The promise of exploration in a difficult territory and resulting so...


Varieté by Eric Cotenas (20th July 2017)

Once a famous trapeze artist until he broke both his legs in a fall, Boss Huller (The Blue Angel's Emil Jannings) now works as the barker of a seedy Hamburg circus showcasing beauty contests of "Parisian dancing girls" (actually homely local girls' school dropouts) and is resentful of the enforced drudgery of his life with his wife (The Last Laugh's Maly Delschaft) and newborn son. One night, a seaman brings with him a young girl he has named Berta-Marie (Buck Privates' Lya De Putti) after the "cursed" freighter of which they are two of the few survivors of a fever that befell the crew and passengers (including the girl's mother) in Cape Verde. Despite his wife's protests, Huller hires the girl as a dancer and gives her a bunk in their trailer. Huller resists his attraction to the girl until she throws herself at him, and he is unable to hide their ensuing illicit...


Homicide: Life on the Street - The Complete Series by Eric Cotenas (15th July 2017)

Coming on the heels of the original Law & Order, the Baltimore-based Homicide: Life on the Street – produced by Barry Levinson (Disclosure) and created by Paul Attanasio (Sphere) from the nonfictional book "Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets" by David Simon (later the creator of The Wire) – was a raw and grittier alternative to the aforementioned series' pretense of "ripped from the headlines" while being more refined in its dramatics and performances than NYPD Blue which launched the same year or the genuine verité of COPS. Largely eschew...


Zach's Ceremony by James-Masaki Ryan (15th July 2017)

“Zach’s Ceremony” (2016) Interviewed at the start of the documentary is 10 year old Zachariah Doomadgee, a young seemingly normal boy who likes normal things as any child would. But he is growing up. As a boy of Aboriginal descent, he will take part in the coming of age ceremony when he turns 16. This documentary chronicles the life of Zach and those around him for the next six years of his life. Growing up in the city environment, he still has close ties to his native roots as his father Alec Doomadgee has been instilling the native culture he had grown up with into the minds of his children and making sure to take them back to their ancestral home village of Doomadgee whenever possible. An amateur boxer who did not have a formal education, he was a hard working single father that did everything he could to make sure his children could have what he didn’t. As years go by, Zach starts to become a young man. But not all is a road to greatness as he starts experimenting with drugs and getting into trouble, bullying continuing due to his fair skin not fitting in with other...


Rough Stuff by James-Masaki Ryan (15th July 2017)

“Rough Stuff” (2017) Participating in a rover competition, the adventurer and risk taker Buzz (played by Gareth Rickards) flips over his vehicle and loses the race, upsetting his navigating partner Abe (played by Vincent Andriano). Their other partner Scraps (played by Sam Glissan) holds the group together but the group is falling apart. But opportunity knocks for Buzz as an activist group is looking for help. With a mining company making an establishment in the outback, the group is looking for a way to the area to film footage secretly and need the expertise of someone like Buzz and his crew to navigate to the isolated area through rocky terrain, forests, and rivers. Buzz has no interest in politics or an environmental crusade, but the leader of the activists Eric (played by Jamie Kristian) shows him something of deep interest - a map to the legendary “Stray’s Gold”. Seeing the authenticity, Buzz decides to get the group involved in the kids’ crusade. Eric may be the br...


The Autopsy of Jane Doe by Anthony Arrigo (14th July 2017)

In my official capacity as a jaded thirty-something horror fan, it isn’t often that a film is able to really surprise me these days. That isn’t to say there aren’t plenty of films each year that blow me away by either smashing expectations or doing something already done, only better. But there just aren’t many movies that keep me guessing right up to the big reveal - not just about the specifics of a plot, but everything about the film’s very nature. “The Autopsy of Jane Doe” (2016) manages to remain enigmatic throughout, anchored by a unique take on a woefully underused sub-genre with a trio of very good performances. The film picked up a healthy level of film festival buzz last year, with glowing praise coming from numerous outlets and even the King of Horror himself, Stephen King (who, to be fair, is not the barometer anyone should use for cinematic taste). I have also seen reviews that criticize the lack of action/slow burn style (GTFO) or the use of horror tropes which, while definitely there, are used to great effect and only serve to further the endless suspense revolving around a young girl’s very dead and very bizarre body. Police are baffled at the scene of a mass murd...


The Wild Wild West Revisited & More Wild Wild West: Double Feature by Robert Segedy (14th July 2017)

Some historical background is necessary before we begin with the synopsis of the films; before the term Steampunk was even invented, there was the television series, "The Wild Wild West" that aired for four seasons (104 episodes) and was a combination of genres: the Western with a James Bond flavor; Michael Garrison, the show’s creator is quoted as saying “James Bond on Horseback.” Basically it was two characters, both secret service agents, James West (Robert Conrad) and Artemis Gordon (Ross Martin) enlisted to protect the then president of the United States, Ulysses S. Grant; the time period was the 1860’s, and there was a constant stream of megalomaniacs that threatened the world’s safety. Most notable amongst them was the diminutive villain, Dr. Miguelito Loveless (Michael Dunn) who starred in ten episodes before his death. The show was highly rated, and regularly featured a number of advanced spy gadgets, a scene where Artemis was in disguise, and of course, some feminine charmer that could not resist James West. And this was 1965-1969! ...


The Wild Wild West Revisited & More Wild Wild West: Double Feature by Robert Segedy (14th July 2017)

Some historical background is necessary before we begin with the synopsis of the films; before the term Steampunk was even invented, there was the television series, "The Wild Wild West" that aired for four seasons (104 episodes) and was a combination of genres: the Western with a James Bond flavor; Michael Garrison, the show’s creator is quoted as saying “James Bond on Horseback.” Basically it was two characters, both secret service agents, James West (Robert Conrad) and Artemis Gordon (Ross Martin) enlisted to protect the then president of the United States, Ulysses S. Grant; the time period was the 1860’s, and there was a constant stream of megalomaniacs that threatened the world’s safety. Most notable amongst them was the diminutive villain, Dr. Miguelito Loveless (Michael Dunn) who starred in ten episodes before his death. The show was highly rated, and regularly featured a number of advanced spy gadgets, a scene where Artemis was in disguise, and of course, some feminine charmer that could not resist James West. And this was 1965-1969! ...


Serial Mom: Collector's Edition by Anthony Arrigo (14th July 2017)

John Waters’ style is generally understood among serious cinema aficionados, enough so that anyone going into one of his pictures would rightly expect two things: subversion and perversion. His early films were packed with both, usually earning an “X” rating when it came time for general release. He softened a bit in the late 80’s and began making pictures with a little more commercial viability, albeit still without major success. After delivering back-to-back retro musicals, Waters turned to a more serious subject: murder. Tackling serious subjects with gallows humor requires a delicate balance of both. Waters perfectly nails the balance between happy home and horror with “Serial Mom” (1994), a subversive serial killer satire that plays against expectations. Making his murderer a housewife whose chipper disposition belies the bloodthirsty monster within tackles many slasher stereotypes with tongue planted firmly in cheek. I became a fan when the film hit VHS a few months after it bombed in theaters, and it’s a title I revisit yearly because even after dozens of viewings Waters’ film feels fresh and relevant as ever. The following is based on a “true story”. Beverly Sutphin (


Wishmaster Collection: Collector's Series 4-Film Set by Anthony Arrigo (11th July 2017)

Pop quiz: how many films are there in the “Puppet Master” (1989) series? How about “The Howling” (1981)? Did you know “Witchcraft” (1988) has spawned thirteen sequels? Horror has plenty of series that somehow managed to remain on life support; a few still going, while others saw producers (grudgingly, I’m sure) pull the plug. Did anyone want any of the sequels that followed “Pumpkinhead” (1988)? How many readers even know a third and fourth installment exist? This is likely the scenario many will find themselves in when staring down Lionsgate’s latest Vestron Video Collection title, the “Wishmaster” collection, which features all four of the demonic Djinn’s outings. If you enjoyed the first film but never got around to seeing the others, don’t let the prospect of three sequels excite you. Just like the “Species” (1995) franchise, these films make a hasty plunge into the subterranean depths of swill right after the first entry. Everyone has fantasized about how they would fulfill their dreams if a genie popped out of the proverbial lamp and offered up three wishes, but few stop to consider the genie’s true intent...


Wishmaster Collection: Collector's Series 4-Film Set by Anthony Arrigo (11th July 2017)

Pop quiz: how many films are there in the “Puppet Master” (1989) series? How about “The Howling” (1981)? Did you know “Witchcraft” (1988) has spawned thirteen sequels? Horror has plenty of series that somehow managed to remain on life support; a few still going, while others saw producers (grudgingly, I’m sure) pull the plug. Did anyone want any of the sequels that followed “Pumpkinhead” (1988)? How many readers even know a third and fourth installment exist? This is likely the scenario many will find themselves in when staring down Lionsgate’s latest Vestron Video Collection title, the “Wishmaster” collection, which features all four of the demonic Djinn’s outings. If you enjoyed the first film but never got around to seeing the others, don’t let the prospect of three sequels excite you. Just like the “Species” (1995) franchise, these films make a hasty plunge into the subterranean depths of swill right after the first entry. Everyone has fantasized about how they would fulfill their dreams if a genie popped out of the proverbial lamp and offered up three wishes, but few stop to consider the genie’s true intent...


Wishmaster Collection: Collector's Series 4-Film Set by Anthony Arrigo (11th July 2017)

Pop quiz: how many films are there in the “Puppet Master” (1989) series? How about “The Howling” (1981)? Did you know “Witchcraft” (1988) has spawned thirteen sequels? Horror has plenty of series that somehow managed to remain on life support; a few still going, while others saw producers (grudgingly, I’m sure) pull the plug. Did anyone want any of the sequels that followed “Pumpkinhead” (1988)? How many readers even know a third and fourth installment exist? This is likely the scenario many will find themselves in when staring down Lionsgate’s latest Vestron Video Collection title, the “Wishmaster” collection, which features all four of the demonic Djinn’s outings. If you enjoyed the first film but never got around to seeing the others, don’t let the prospect of three sequels excite you. Just like the “Species” (1995) franchise, these films make a hasty plunge into the subterranean depths of swill right after the first entry. Everyone has fantasized about how they would fulfill their dreams if a genie popped out of the proverbial lamp and offered up three wishes, but few stop to consider the genie’s true intent...


Wishmaster Collection: Collector's Series 4-Film Set by Anthony Arrigo (11th July 2017)

Pop quiz: how many films are there in the “Puppet Master” (1989) series? How about “The Howling” (1981)? Did you know “Witchcraft” (1988) has spawned thirteen sequels? Horror has plenty of series that somehow managed to remain on life support; a few still going, while others saw producers (grudgingly, I’m sure) pull the plug. Did anyone want any of the sequels that followed “Pumpkinhead” (1988)? How many readers even know a third and fourth installment exist? This is likely the scenario many will find themselves in when staring down Lionsgate’s latest Vestron Video Collection title, the “Wishmaster” collection, which features all four of the demonic Djinn’s outings. If you enjoyed the first film but never got around to seeing the others, don’t let the prospect of three sequels excite you. Just like the “Species” (1995) franchise, these films make a hasty plunge into the subterranean depths of swill right after the first entry. Everyone has fantasized about how they would fulfill their dreams if a genie popped out of the proverbial lamp and offered up three wishes, but few stop to consider the genie’s true intent...


Donnie Darko: Limited Edition by Anthony Arrigo (11th July 2017)

When considering the most auspicious debuts of the 21st century, one film that consistently appears near the top of many lists is writer/director Richard Kelly’s bleak riff on time travel and teenage philosophy, “Donnie Darko” (2001). Largely ignored upon release – more than likely because the storyline prominently features a jet engine disaster and it was released a mere month after 9/11, signalling the studio death knell – Kelly’s film almost immediately gained a cult status, one that has been feverishly growing ever since. In the ensuing years a sequel was released, and by all accounts (my own included) “S. Darko” (2009) is a steaming pile of horsesh*t. Kelly has attempted to recapture the critical success (or, sadly, any success at this point) of his debut in the years since but nothing has stuck with audiences like “Donnie Darko”. Just over 15 years later, the film remains as potent and cleverly warped as ever. Donnie Darko (Jake Gyllenhaal) is not your normal teenager, unless you count his complete disdain for authority. He sleepwalks. He sees a psychotherapist. He also see...


TECHNICAL REVIEWS
La rupture by James-Masaki Ryan (7th May 2017)

"La rupture" AKA "The Breach" (1970) Helene Regnier’s husband Charles injures their son Michel in a psychotic rage. Charles moves back in with his wealthy and manipulative parents, who blame Helene for their son’s condition and vow to win custody of Michel. Thwarted by the courts, they hire a seedy penniless operative Paul to destroy her reputation. He moves into her rooming house and begins to insinuate himself into her life, hatching darker and more convoluted plots to implicate Helene. A harrowing thriller from France's master of suspense, "La rupture" ranks among Claude Chabrol's finest works. "La rupture" was director Claude Chabrol's 19th feature and made during his golden age of critical acclaim. Starring his then wife Stéphane Audran in the role of the tormented Helene, she gives an excellent performance on the physically and mentally shocked wife. Also starring Jean-Claude Drouot and Jean-Pierre Cassel, and based off the novel by


Chosen by James-Masaki Ryan (5th May 2017)

"Chosen" (2016) An epic tale of family, honor, vengeance and salvation in World War II. The year is 1944 and the Jews of Eastern Europe are being massacred by the thousands. An unassuming recently widowed Hungarian barrister leads an inspirational fight back against the increasingly desperate and dangerous Nazis in the dying embers of the war. With a combination of daring, courage and audacity he turns a struggle to survive into something far more consequential - a way to avenge the deaths of his people by saving thousands of others. Based on true events, "Chosen" is a harrowing account of the Hungarian lawyer Sunsun (played by Luke Mably) who loses his wife to cancer, loses his home and freedom to the Nazi regime during World War II. Also starring Ana Ularu and Harvey Keitel, directed by Jasmin Dizdar, the film is an emotional draw yet it has some minor issues . The flashback storytelling, the underdeveloped supporting characters, and the slightly lack...


Les biches by James-Masaki Ryan (5th May 2017)

"Les biches" AKA "The Does" (1968) Directed by Claude Chabrol, "Les biches" is a landmark in film history: its theme of bisexuality and upper-class decadence is surpassed only by its cool precision of cinematic style and exceptionally subtle performances. Socialite Frederique (Stephane Audran) encounters young student Why (Jacqueline Sassard) on the streets of Paris, seduces her and whisks her off to spend winter with the chic crowd of St. Tropez. When architect Paul (Jean-Louis Trintignant) meets Why, he too charms her and comes between the two lovers. Frederiqe then seduces Paul out of jealousy, but finds herself feeling real love. Paul and Frederique invite Why to live together with them, resulting in a ménage a trios beset by jealousy, madness, and ultimately, murder. "Les biches" was Chabrol's 15th film in a 10 year span, and was seen as an artistic comeback after a series of underwhelming works. Not a large commercial success, but "Les biches" w...


Broadchurch: Series 3 (TV) (Blu-ray) by Rick Curzon (28th April 2017)

Three years have passed in a town that will never forget; but times change. The local newspaper, once the backbone of Broadchurch, is about to be closed down. And DI Alec Hardy with DS Ellie Miller are about to explore a case that reopens old wounds and divides the town in ways they could never have predicted. Hardy and Miller are called on to investigate the brutal sexual assault of a local woman, Trish Winterman. The crime scene points to a party attended by close to a hundred people. But not a casual assault the act appears premeditated. What dark secrets still lie buried in a town that has been so closely examined? And how will unresolved issues around the death of young Danny Latimer finally be settled? These answers lie in Broadchurch: The Final Chapter....


Brothers (The): Series 5 (TV) by Rick Curzon (20th April 2017)

The fifth season of the classic BBC One Sunday soap sees the Hammond clan in deep public and private turmoil. As David (Robin Chadwick) comes to terms with his wife s death and Brian (Richard Easton) reels from the reverberations of his divorce, Edward (Patrick O'Connell) is in constant battle with scheming banker Paul Merroney (Colin Baker) about the direction of the family haulage firm. Edward finally ties the knot with Jennifer (Jennifer Kingsley), who has seemingly won over her new mother-in-law Mary (Jean Anderson), and with all eyes on the wedding, Merroney manipulates a bid for the ailing company. But he hasn't reckoned on a counter-bid from tough-talking air freight chief Jane Maxwell (Kate O Mara). As Merroney woos a rich Lebanese backer, the brothers plot to oust him from the firm altogether, but as always he's a tricky man to outfox....


Experiment in Terror by Samuel Scott (16th April 2017)

***This is an A/V and Extras review only. For reviews on the movie from various critics, we recommend visiting HERE*** Terror stalks a beautiful bank teller in this classic thriller from Blade Edwards. Glenn Ford plays the dedicated F.B.I. agent, John Ripley, who fights to protect Kelly Sherwood (Lee Remick) from a ruthless killer. Unless his plans to rob the bank succeed, the unseen assailant (Ross Martin) - identifiable only by his asthmatic breathing - threatens to murder Kelly and her teenage sister, Toby (Stephanie Powers). To save the two terrorised sisters, the F.B.I. sets up an elaborate trap using Kelly as a decoy, but the killer gets away. Nerve-racking suspense builds as Kelly, now panic-stricken, continues to act as bait long enough to let the Feds trap the killer. Unless they act quickly, the woman in distress will become the casualty of a deadly EXPERIMENT IN TERROR!...


Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid by Samuel Scott (11th April 2017)

***This is an A/V and Extras review only. For reviews on the movie from various critics, we recommend visiting HERE*** Laugh... or I'll blow your lips off! As the private eye of private eyes, Steve Martin is Rigby Reardon. He’s tough, rough and ready to take anything when Juliet Forrest (Rachel Ward) appears on the scene with a case: her father, a noted scientist, philanthropist and cheese-maker has died mysteriously. Reardon immediately smells a rat and follows a complex maze of clues that lead to the “Carlotta Lists’. With a little help from his “friends”, Alan Ladd, Barbara Stanwyck, Ray Milland, Burt Lancaster, Humphrey Bogart, Charles Laughton, etc, Reardon gets his man. An exciting, action-packed film the way 40s’ films used to be!...


Swiss Army Man by Samuel Scott (9th April 2017)

***This is an A/V and Extras review only. For reviews on the movie from various critics, we recommend visiting HERE*** Bursting with limitless creativity, SWISS ARMY MAN goes from the absurd to the emotional to the whimsical to the profound and back again. Hank (Paul Dano) is stranded on a deserted island, having given up all hope of ever making it home again. But one day everything changes when a corpse named Manny (Daniel Radcliffe) washes up on shore; the two become fast friends, and ultimately go on an epic adventure that will bring Hank back to the woman of his dreams. SWISS ARMY MAN creates a world like no other—a place of pure fantastical imagination, brimming with magical realism yet featuring two characters whose dreams and fears are entirely relatable. Dano and Radcliffe both fully commit to their directors’ audacious vision, and their work is exceptional, finding the perfect balance of humour and heart that drives the whole film. A celebration of all the wonders cinema has to offer, SWISS ARMY MAN is a cultural phenomenon in the making -- a surreal and wholly original examination of human vulnerability and connection that must be experienced...


Bird on a Wire by Samuel Scott (4th April 2017)

***This is an A/V and Extras review only. For reviews on the movie from various critics, we recommend visiting HERE*** Mel Gibson and Goldie Hawn team up in this non-stop-action comedy directed by John Badham. Hiding under the FBI Witness Protection Program, Rick Jarmin (Gibson) gets nervous when old flame Marianne Graves (Hawn) recognises him. But before he can assume a new identity, the man he put in jail (David Carradine) is released and comes to pay his respects. Rick and Marianne find themselves thrown together on an exhilarating cross-country scramble, barely evading the gangsters, police and an amorous veterinarian (Joan Severance). Their whirlwind travels eventually lead to an unforgettable climax in an elaborate zoo exhibit. A rare rollercoaster of a movie which will keep you on the edge of your seat....


Front (The) by Samuel Scott (3rd April 2017)

***This is an A/V and Extras review only. For reviews on the movie from various critics, we recommend visiting HERE*** What if there were a list? A list that said: Our finest actors weren't allowed to act. Our best writers aren't allowed to write. Our funniest comedians aren't allowed to make us laugh. What would it be like if there were such a list? It would be like America in 1953....


Big Heat (The) by Samuel Scott (2nd April 2017)

***This is an A/V and Extras review only. For reviews on the movie from various critics, we recommend visiting HERE*** A HARD COP AND A SOFT DAME… IN A BRASS-KNUCKLE THRILLER! Fritz Lang’s iconic film noir masterpiece is an uncompromising exploration of corruption and violence at the dark heart of small-town America. Glenn Ford is the good cop in a bad town, who single-handedly takes on local mobsters headed by Alexander Scourby and his psychotic right-hand man Lee Marvin....


Mum's List by Samuel Scott (18th March 2017)

***This is an A/V and Extras review only. For reviews on the movie from various critics, we recommend visiting HERE*** One of the most memorable, uplifting and beautiful stories of recent years, MUM’S LIST is a romance for all ages. Now a feature film, the true story of a profound, unstoppable and undying love is based on the best-selling book by St John (Singe) Greene, published by Penguin Books in the United Kingdom in 2012. Written and directed by Niall Johnson (“White Noise”; ”Keeping Mum”), it is the story of Singe and Kate, a couple from North Somerset, whose lives were turned upside down when Kate was diagnosed with an incurable breast cancer. Over her last few days, she created her list: writing her thoughts and memories down, to help the man she loved create the best life possible for their two sons, after she was gone....


Shackleton (TV) by Rick Curzon (13th March 2017)

A gripping four-part drama about the great explorer s epic Antarctic expeditions, based on Shackleton s own journals. Having had a taste of Antarctic adventure on Captain Scott s failed 1901 bid to reach the South Pole, seven years later Ernest Shackleton (David Schofield) leads his own expedition. Agonisingly close to reaching the Pole, the men have to pull back in an appalling blizzard to reach their ship before the advancing ice cuts off the passage home. By 1911 Roald Amundsen has reached the Pole and Scott and his men, trailing in the Norwegian s wake, have perished. Undeterred, in 1914 Shackleton and his trusted deputy Frank Wild (David Rodigan) set out their most famous journey aboard Endurance, with the aim of crossing the icy continent from sea to sea. When the ship is trapped and crushed by pack-ice, Shackleton and five of his men embark on a desperate 800-mile journey from Elephant Island to South Georgia in the James Caird, a 20-foot lifeboat pitched against the furious Southern Ocean. Once they hit land, the fastest way to reach help on the other side of the island will be to improvise a route across the treacherous mountain interior. With Wild and the rest of the men left behind with dwindling supplies at their makes...


Snowden by Rick Curzon (13th March 2017)

From three-time Oscar-winner, Oliver Stone, SNOWDEN is a riveting personal look at one of the most polarising figures of the 21st century, the man responsible for what has been described as the most far-reaching security breach in U.S. intelligence history. Snowden opens the door on the untold story of Edward Snowden, examining the forces that turned a conservative young patriot eager to serve his country into a historic whistle-blower and posing provocative questions about which liberties we are willing to give up in order for our government to protect us....


Pet by Samuel Scott (9th March 2017)

***This is an A/V and Extras review only. For reviews on the movie from various critics, we recommend visiting HERE*** This haunting, psychological horror follows Seth, a lonely man working in an animal shelter. His monotonous routine is broken one day when he bumps into Holly, a girl from school who he soon becomes obsessed with. However, when she rejects his advances, Seth's obsession reaches a terrifying new level, with Holly hiding secrets of her own. Helmed by Award Winning director Carles Torrens (Apartment 143, ABCs of Death 2.5) and starring Dominic Monaghan (Lord of the Rings trilogy), Ksenia Solo (Lost Girl, Black Swan) and Jennette McCurdy (Between, Sam & Cat), Pet is a dark and disturbing love story asking how much you could sacrifice in the name of love?...


The Angry Video Game Nerd: Season 8 by James-Masaki Ryan (26th February 2017)

“The Angry Video Game Nerd: Season 8” (2013-2014) The web series “Angry Video Game Nerd” has been a continuous mainstay on YouTube for over 10 years now - a lone white button-up shirt wearing nerd that plays terrible retro games and takes out his frustration with Rolling Rock beer and loud outbursts of obscenities. Conceptually it sounds like many other YouTube channels of useless videos of so called critics commenting haphazardly and without merit, but writer/director/star James Rolfe sets his show apart from others with creative production work, witty scriptwriting, great editing, and rewatchability. While episodes used to come every two weeks, Rolfe started to slow down the pace of AVGN episodes to concentrate on other work - other web series such as “Board James” and “James & Mike Mondays”, and the theatrical feature film “Angry Video Game Nerd: The Movie”. The AVGN web series had been released on the DVD f...


Last Detail (The) by Samuel Scott (23rd February 2017)

***This is an A/V and Extras review only. For reviews on the movie from various critics, we recommend visiting HERE*** "No *#@!!* Navy's going to give some poor *!!@ kid eight years in the #@!* brig without me taking him out for the time of his *#@!!* life." When Buddusky (Jack Nicholson) and Mulhall (Otis Young) are detailed to take a young sailor, Meadows (Randy Quaid), from a Virginia Naval Base to a New Hampshire Naval Prison to serve an eight-year sentence for a trivial offense they decide to show him a good time on their journey north......


The Angry Video Game Nerd: Season 7 by James-Masaki Ryan (23rd February 2017)

“The Angry Video Game Nerd: Season 7” (2012) The web series “Angry Video Game Nerd” has been a continuous mainstay on YouTube for over 10 years now - a lone white button-up shirt wearing nerd that plays terrible retro games and takes out his frustration with Rolling Rock beer and loud outbursts of obscenities. Conceptually it sounds like many other YouTube channels of useless videos of so called critics commenting haphazardly and without merit, but writer/director/star James Rolfe sets his show apart from others with creative production work, witty scriptwriting, great editing, and rewatchability. While episodes used to come every two weeks, Rolfe started to slow down the pace of AVGN episodes to concentrate on other work - other web series such as “Board James” and “James & Mike Mondays”, and the theatrical feature film “Angry Video Game Nerd: The Movie”. The AVGN web series had been released on the DVD format...


The Angry Video Game Nerd: Season 6 by James-Masaki Ryan (19th February 2017)

“The Angry Video Game Nerd: Season 6” (2011-2012) The web series “Angry Video Game Nerd” has been a continuous mainstay on YouTube for over 10 years now - a lone white button-up shirt wearing nerd that plays terrible retro games and takes out his frustration with Rolling Rock beer and loud outbursts of obscenities. Conceptually it sounds like many other YouTube channels of useless videos of so called critics commenting haphazardly and without merit, but writer/director/star James Rolfe sets his show apart from others with creative production work, witty scriptwriting, great editing, and rewatchability. While episodes used to come every two weeks, Rolfe started to slow down the pace of AVGN episodes to concentrate on other work - other web series such as “Board James” and “James & Mike Mondays”, and the theatrical feature film “Angry Video Game Nerd: The Movie”. The AVGN web series had been released on the DVD f...


The Angry Video Game Nerd: Season 5 by James-Masaki Ryan (17th February 2017)

“The Angry Video Game Nerd: Season 5” (2010) The web series “Angry Video Game Nerd” has been a continuous mainstay on YouTube for over 10 years now - a lone white button-up shirt wearing nerd that plays terrible retro games and takes out his frustration with Rolling Rock beer and loud outbursts of obscenities. Conceptually it sounds like many other YouTube channels of useless videos of so called critics commenting haphazardly and without merit, but writer/director/star James Rolfe sets his show apart from others with creative production work, witty scriptwriting, great editing, and rewatchability. While episodes used to come every two weeks, Rolfe started to slow down the pace of AVGN episodes to concentrate on other work - other web series such as “Board James” and “James & Mike Mondays”, and the theatrical feature film “Angry Video Game Nerd: The Movie”. The AVGN web series had been released on the DVD format...


The Angry Video Game Nerd: Season 3 by James-Masaki Ryan (15th February 2017)

“The Angry Video Game Nerd: Season 3” (2008) The web series “Angry Video Game Nerd” has been a continuous mainstay on YouTube for over 10 years now - a lone white button-up shirt wearing nerd that plays terrible retro games and takes out his frustration with Rolling Rock beer and loud outbursts of obscenities. Conceptually it sounds like many other YouTube channels of useless videos of so called critics commenting haphazardly and without merit, but writer/director/star James Rolfe sets his show apart from others with creative production work, witty scriptwriting, great editing, and rewatchability. While episodes used to come every two weeks, Rolfe started to slow down the pace of AVGN episodes to concentrate on other work - other web series such as “Board James” and “James & Mike Mondays”, and the theatrical feature film “Angry Video Game Nerd: The Movie”. The AVGN web series had been released on the DVD format...


The Angry Video Game Nerd: Season 4 by James-Masaki Ryan (15th February 2017)

“The Angry Video Game Nerd: Season 4” (2009) The web series “Angry Video Game Nerd” has been a continuous mainstay on YouTube for over 10 years now - a lone white button-up shirt wearing nerd that plays terrible retro games and takes out his frustration with Rolling Rock beer and loud outbursts of obscenities. Conceptually it sounds like many other YouTube channels of useless videos of so called critics commenting haphazardly and without merit, but writer/director/star James Rolfe sets his show apart from others with creative production work, witty scriptwriting, great editing, and rewatchability. While episodes used to come every two weeks, Rolfe started to slow down the pace of AVGN episodes to concentrate on other work - other web series such as “Board James” and “James & Mike Mondays”, and the theatrical feature film “Angry Video Game Nerd: The Movie”. The AVGN web series had been released on the DVD format...


Apple Tree Yard (The) (TV) by Rick Curzon (14th February 2017)

***This is an A/V and Extras review only. For reviews on the show from various critics, we recommend visiting HERE.*** Emily Watson stars as Yvonne Carmichael, a married woman living a quiet life with her husband and two children. Her world is turned upside down however, when a chance meeting with alluring stranger Mark Costley (Ben Chaplin) leads to a passionate affair. Despite her best attempts to keep her home life and career separate from her affair, Yvonne begins to lose control as a series of bad decisions soon leave her facing a court trial....


Bunny Lake Is Missing by Samuel Scott (13th February 2017)

***This is an A/V and Extras review only. For reviews on the movie from various critics, we recommend visiting HERE*** Definitely – no clues! In this suspense film even one clue might tell all! THE SEARCH FOR 'BUNNY LAKE’ IS ON! When Ann Lake (Carol Lynley) arrives to collect her four-year-old daughter, Bunny, from nursery, she is told that no child of that name is enrolled there. Superintendent Newhouse (Lawrence Olivier) is assigned to the case, and before long a number of people are under suspicion, including the child's protective uncle (Keir Dullea), the Lake's eccentric landlord (Noël Coward) and the school's eccentric ex-headmistress (Martita Hunt). However, when he learns that no-one has actually ever seen the child, Newhouse begins to suspect that the young woman may be unbalanced....


The Angry Video Game Nerd: Season 1 by James-Masaki Ryan (13th February 2017)

“The Angry Video Game Nerd: Season 1” (2004-2006) The web series “Angry Video Game Nerd” has been a continuous mainstay on YouTube for over 10 years now - a lone white button-up shirt wearing nerd that plays terrible retro games and takes out his frustration with Rolling Rock beer and loud outbursts of obscenities. Conceptually it sounds like many other YouTube channels of useless videos of so called critics commenting haphazardly and without merit, but writer/director/star James Rolfe sets his show apart from others with creative production work, witty scriptwriting, great editing, and rewatchability. While episodes used to come every two weeks, Rolfe started to slow down the pace of AVGN episodes to concentrate on other work - other web series such as “Board James” and “James & Mike Mondays”, and the theatrical feature film “Angry Video Game Nerd: The Movie”. The AVGN web series had been released on the DVD f...


The Angry Video Game Nerd; Season 2 by James-Masaki Ryan (13th February 2017)

“The Angry Video Game Nerd: Season 2” (2007) The web series “Angry Video Game Nerd” has been a continuous mainstay on YouTube for over 10 years now - a lone white button-up shirt wearing nerd that plays terrible retro games and takes out his frustration with Rolling Rock beer and loud outbursts of obscenities. Conceptually it sounds like many other YouTube channels of useless videos of so called critics commenting haphazardly and without merit, but writer/director/star James Rolfe sets his show apart from others with creative production work, witty scriptwriting, great editing, and rewatchability. While episodes used to come every two weeks, Rolfe started to slow down the pace of AVGN episodes to concentrate on other work - other web series such as “Board James” and “James & Mike Mondays”, and the theatrical feature film “Angry Video Game Nerd: The Movie”. The AVGN web series had been released on the DVD format...


Shadow of the Noose: The Complete Series (TV) by Rick Curzon (13th February 2017)

***This is an A/V and Extras review only. For reviews on the show from various critics, we recommend visiting HERE.*** Directed by BAFTA-winner Matthew Robinson (Byker Grove / Eastenders) and Sebastian Graham Jones (Mystery!: Cadfael), Shadow of the Noose tells the true story of the career and personal life of "The Great Defender" Sir Edward Marshall Hall. He was London's most celebrated barrister and the first world-famous legal celebrity, whose gripping cases consistently made news headlines and drew crowds in to the public gallery of the Old Bailey during the late Victorian era and early Edwardian era. Jonathan Hyde (Titanic) brings Marshall Hall’s style and personality to life on screen in an outstanding performance. Marshall Hall was known for his theatrics as he argued his cases with gusto and determination, keeping the Court audience on the edge of their seat, particularly at a time when a guilty verdict meant facing the rope. Throughout the series, which is based on true cases, Marshall Hall tackles a variety of seemingly impossible and controversial cases, and defends a colourful array of characters. Whether championing a lowly German pro...


Anderson Tapes (The) by Samuel Scott (8th February 2017)

***This is an A/V and Extras review only. For reviews on the movie from various critics, we recommend visiting HERE*** Someone is listening... Someone is watching... As the crime of the century unreels! When Duke Anderson (Connery) is released from prison after serving ten years for taking the rap for a Mafia family, he cashes in a debt of honour and gets the funds he needs to bankroll an ambitious robbery. Planning to ransack a exclusive East Side New York Apartment building, he rounds up a gang of top-flight thieves, and proceeds to carry out his caper unaware that he is being taped....


New Centurions (The) AKA Precinct 45: Los Angeles Police by Chris Gould (1st February 2017)

* Note - The following review references not having the booklet to hand. We have now received the booklet from Powerhouse and the review will be updated very soon. ***This is an A/V and Extras review only. For reviews on the movie from various critics, we recommend visiting HERE*** Richard Fleischer's gritty and fateful portrait of LA cops adapted from Joseph Wambaugh's autobiographical best-seller, is anchored by superb performances from George C. Scott as a world-weary older cop who quietly fears becoming obsolete, and Stacy Keach as the young rookie he takes under his wing....


Greenberg by Samuel Scott (30th January 2017)

***This is a technical review only. For reviews on the movie from various critics, we recommend visiting HERE.*** He's got a lot on his mind. Roger Greenberg (Stiller) is single, fortyish and deliberately doing nothing. In search of a place to restart his life, he agrees to housesit for his brother in LA and tries to reconnect with his former bandmate (Rhys Ifans) and ex-girlfriend (Jennifer Jason Leigh). But his old friends aren't necessarily still best friends, and Greenberg soon finds himself forging a connection with his brother's personal assistant, Florence (Greta Gerwig). Despite his best attempts not to be drawn in, Greenberg comes to realise that he may at last have found a reason to be happy....


Vampires AKA John Carpenter's Vampires by Chris Gould (29th January 2017)

***This is an A/V and Extras review only. For reviews on the movie from various critics, we recommend visiting HERE*** James Woods leads a band of ruthless vampire hunters in a blood-soaked battle against the undead. Also starring Sheryl Lee, Daniel Baldwin and Maximillian Schell, Carpenter crafts a tense, brutal and action-packed horror/western crossover....


Ghosts of Mars by Chris Gould (25th January 2017)

***This is an A/V and Extras review only. For reviews on the movie from various critics, we recommend visiting HERE*** John Carpenter blends horror and sci-fi in this action adventure set on Mars in the year 2176 as Martian police battle supernatural forces unleashed by a deep mining facility....


100 Streets by Samuel Scott (24th January 2017)

***This is an A/V and Extras review only. For reviews on the movie from various critics, we recommend visiting HERE*** Three people, three extraordinary stories. All lived out within a hundred London streets. Directed by Emmy and Golden Globe-nominated Jim O’Hanlon, 100 STREETS is a layered and gripping drama, with an original screenplay by Leon F Butler. It takes a compelling look at the vibrant and complicated life of a group of individuals in contemporary London – destination capital of the world. 100 STREETS intersect the film’s setting. Chelsea is just down the road from high-rise estates, riverside opulence contrasts with the day-to-day grind. It’s in these streets that the characters face major choices and fundamental change in their separate lives, as they negotiate their paths through life - through those hundred streets....


Brothers (The): Series 4 (TV) by Rick Curzon (22nd January 2017)

***This is an A/V and Extras review only. For reviews on the show from various critics, we recommend visiting HERE.*** Financial shenanigans, ill health and industrial action all threaten the Hammonds family business in the fourth series of BBC One s classic Sunday night drama. When matriarch Mary (Jean Anderson) suffers another heart attack, the family rallies round and Edward (Patrick O Connell) decides to keep quiet about his impending marriage to his father s former mistress Jennifer (Jennifer Kingsley). After rapid expansion, moves are afoot for the Hammonds to go public. Brian (Richard Easton) has money man Martin Farrell (Murray Hayne) join the board, while Edward appoints ex-foreman Bill Riley (Derek Benfield) to help run the business. Farrell is alert to the firm s organisational weakness, while Riley is suspected of causing unrest among the workers about the new share issue. The company is floated at a time of deep tension, on the advice of slippery merchant banker Paul Merroney (Colin Baker), and Edward is left fighting for survival as chairman. Can he rely on the support of all the family?...


Young Pope (The) (TV) by Samuel Scott (10th January 2017)

***This is an A/V and Extras review only. For reviews on the show from various critics, we recommend visiting HERE.*** His religion is revolution. Lenny Belardo, aka Pius XIII, is the first American Pope in history. Young and charming, his election might seem the result of a simple and effective media strategy by the College of Cardinals. But, as we know, appearances can be deceptive. Especially in the place and among the people who have chosen the great mystery of God as the guiding light of their existence. That place is the Vatican and those people are the leaders of the Catholic Church. And the most mysterious and contradictory figure of all turns out to be Pius XIII himself. Shrewd and naive, old-fashioned and very modern, doubtful and resolute, ironic, pedantic, hurt and ruthless, Pius XIII tries to walk the long path of human loneliness to find a God for mankind. And for himself....


Happy Birthday to Me by Samuel Scott (5th January 2017)

***This is an A/V and Extras review only. For reviews on the movie from various critics, we recommend visiting HERE.*** Six of the most bizarre murders you will ever see. Popular high school senior Virginia Wainwright (Melissa Sue Anderson) survives a freak accident, but suffers from memory loss and traumatic blackouts. As she attempts to resume a normal life, something terrible is happening - her friends are being ruthlessly murdered one by one. But will she be the next victim or is she the killer? Director J. Lee Thompson's classic shocker was made during the period before the horror genre drenched itself in irony and self-reflexivity, and instead revels in the effective staging of the terrifying set-pieces which drive it towards its climax. Pray you're not invited....


Magnum, P.I.: Season 1 (TV) by Rick Curzon (26th December 2016)

***This is an A/V and Extras review only. For reviews on the show from various critics, we recommend visiting HERE.*** Vietnam veteran Thomas Magnum (Tom Selleck) leaves the Navy to take up position as a private eye and security advisor to famous author Robin Masters in the cultural melting pot of 1980's Oahu, Hawaii. He is soon living the high life with Master's beachfront mansion and Ferrari, but soon the idyll is not all it seems and Magnum is drawn into the island's underworld. An impressive 130 hours of television across 157 episodes over 8 seasons of groundbreaking and unconventional storytelling, join Magnum for a thrill ride of explosive action and frantic chases in the unforgettable Emmy® Award and Golden Globe® winning series, now available fully restored and in high definition for the first time....


Magnum, P.I.: Season 8 (TV) by Rick Curzon (26th December 2016)

***This is an A/V and Extras review only. For reviews on the show from various critics, we recommend visiting HERE.*** Vietnam veteran Thomas Magnum (Tom Selleck) leaves the Navy to take up position as a private eye and security advisor to famous author Robin Masters in the cultural melting pot of 1980's Oahu, Hawaii. He is soon living the high life with Master's beachfront mansion and Ferrari, but soon the idyll is not all it seems and Magnum is drawn into the island's underworld. An impressive 130 hours of television across 157 episodes over 8 seasons of groundbreaking and unconventional storytelling, join Magnum for a thrill ride of explosive action and frantic chases in the unforgettable Emmy® Award and Golden Globe® winning series, now available fully restored and in high definition for the first time....


Magnum, P.I.: Season 7 (TV) by Rick Curzon (26th December 2016)

***This is an A/V and Extras review only. For reviews on the show from various critics, we recommend visiting HERE.*** Vietnam veteran Thomas Magnum (Tom Selleck) leaves the Navy to take up position as a private eye and security advisor to famous author Robin Masters in the cultural melting pot of 1980's Oahu, Hawaii. He is soon living the high life with Master's beachfront mansion and Ferrari, but soon the idyll is not all it seems and Magnum is drawn into the island's underworld. An impressive 130 hours of television across 157 episodes over 8 seasons of groundbreaking and unconventional storytelling, join Magnum for a thrill ride of explosive action and frantic chases in the unforgettable Emmy® Award and Golden Globe® winning series, now available fully restored and in high definition for the first time....


Magnum, P.I.: Season 6 (TV) by Rick Curzon (26th December 2016)

***This is an A/V and Extras review only. For reviews on the show from various critics, we recommend visiting HERE.*** Vietnam veteran Thomas Magnum (Tom Selleck) leaves the Navy to take up position as a private eye and security advisor to famous author Robin Masters in the cultural melting pot of 1980's Oahu, Hawaii. He is soon living the high life with Master's beachfront mansion and Ferrari, but soon the idyll is not all it seems and Magnum is drawn into the island's underworld. An impressive 130 hours of television across 157 episodes over 8 seasons of groundbreaking and unconventional storytelling, join Magnum for a thrill ride of explosive action and frantic chases in the unforgettable Emmy® Award and Golden Globe® winning series, now available fully restored and in high definition for the first time....